Common Myths About Beer

There are several common misconceptions about beer, but you shouldn’t believe everything you hear. There’s no doubt you’ve heard about these myths, so let us shine some light on the truth.

Myth: Beer is Best Served Ice Cold

We’ve all seen the commercials advertising drinking beer ice cold or serving the beverage in a frosted mug, but this causes beer to lose its aromatics. Beer served at near-frozen temperatures blinds the taste experience because your tastebuds will be more shocked by the frigid temperature of the liquid. Beer is typically dispensed between 38°- 42°. Some more flavorful beers may be served at warmer temperatures to ensure maximum flavor.

Myth: Drinking Too Much Beer Results in a Beer Belly

We aren’t sure where this saying came from, but it is false. You’re more likely to get a large belly due to consuming unhealthy food and a lack of exercise. Yes, beer has calories, but not as much as a triple cheeseburger, fries, and a milkshake. Enjoying a beer now and again won’t give you a beer belly. Moderation is key.

Myth: Beer Kills Brain Cells

When a person consumes too many beers, they experience slurred speech, lack of physical balance, forgetfulness, and other symptoms. So, what’s going on? High levels of alcohol can interrupt the signals being sent to your brain, but it doesn’t kill your brain cells. According to the American Journal of Epidemiology, participants did not experience a decrease in brain cells or cognitive behavior. Nonetheless, it is not proposed that these findings be used to encourage increased alcohol consumption.

Myth: Canned Beer Tastes Cheap

Don’t judge a beer by its can. Canned beer doesn’t indicate the quality of a beer. This idea may stem from a personal preference similar to people assuming a wine bottle with a screwed top is automatically a lower quality than one with a cork.

The best way to preserve beer is to prevent oxygen and light from penetrating the beer. The most effective way to do that is to store it in a can. Oxygen can seep into the tops of beer bottles and dark glass bottles may not always block light. If you don’t want to drink beer from a can, pour it into a glass.

Myth: Dark Beers Have More Alcohol Than Light Beers

Many people think the darker the beer, the more bitter or stronger it will be. Guinness is automatically assumed to have a higher alcohol content due to its color, but it only has 4.2 percent compared to Bud Light Platinum’s six percent.

Regardless of your preference for bottled, canned, light, or dark, enjoy your beverage at the correct temperature and drink in moderation.

 

 

What’s the Difference Between Ales and Lagers

The first step in learning about beer is to understand the difference between ales and lagers. Ales and lagers are the two main classifications of the beer family. Ales are considered traditional brews, that are generally more robust as they are rarely filtered while Lagers are usually heavily filtered with much cleaner presentations due to the cold lagering period. The difference has nothing to do with the alcohol content or the color. It all begins with the brewing process.

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The Evolution of Devil’s Purse Brewing Company

Matt Belson and Mike Segerson started brewing together in 2010. What started off as a hobby, quickly evolved into a passion. After weekly gatherings to brew and talk about beer, the pair came up with the idea for Devil’s Purse Brewing Company and their goal to open a craft brewery in Cape Cod, became a reality.

Belson and Segerson improved their craft by traveling to a variety of breweries and obtaining advice from professional brewers. After several site visits, they found a wonderful location to open their brewery in the town of Dennis. On Jan. 1, 2015, Belson and Segerson received their permits and their first test batch of beer was brewed on Feb. 27, 2015.

After years of brewing in their home kitchen, tasting their first beer brewed in their new commercial system was, “truly satisfying, especially when it tasted delicious,” said Belson.

Throughout the years, Devil’s Purse Brewing Company has evolved into producing a variety of beers, including Surfman’s Check™ ESB and Pollock Rip™ IPA. Due to their love of creativity and experimentation, they feature rotating and seasonal beers including Cuddy Queen™ American Pale Ale, Shiso Berry Ale, Dock Lizard™ Imperial Spiced Ale, and Sevenstones™ Double IPA.

The journey to opening Devil’s Purse Brewing Company was filled with incredible experiences, trial and error, and many laughs.

“Starting Devil’s Purse Brewing Company has been and remains an incredible journey,” said Belson. “We could not have come this far without the support of our families, friends, and positive guidance from incredible people along the way.”

Belson and Segerson are devoted to brewing their beer with the finest ingredients. Having the opportunity to share their handcrafted beers with the public is a dream come true.

“We continue to be inspired by the tremendous craft beers that are being produced around the country,” said Segerson. “We are excited to share them with our awesome Cape Cod community and for all lovers of craft beer to enjoy.”

Originally Featured: https://www.mclaughlinmoran.com/blog/?p=129

5 Fun Facts About Beer

With the holidays coming up, we’re quite sure you’ll have a drink or two. If you need something to talk about, drink up these fun facts about beer and sound smarter while you’re waiting for dinner to be served!

7.5 million liters of beer were served at Oktoberfest 2017

Oktoberfest is one of the most popular celebrations for beer consumers. This year’s event was another success with approximately 6.2 million visitors and 7.5 million liters of beer consumed. That number is up from 7.3 million liters at Oktoberfest 2015.

Doctors prescribed “medical beer”

During prohibition, brewers, physicians, and imbibers attempted to persuade U.S. Congress that beer was vital medicine. In March 1921, Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer declared “doctors to prescribe beer at any time, under any circumstances and in any amount they saw fit.” Doctors prescribed “medical beer” from March 1921 to November 1921 until Congress banned it.

New Hampshire consumes the most beer

You would think Nevada would have been number one, but New Hampshire takes the top spot in beer consumption with 41.7 gallons annually per capita. Montana was second with 39.1 gallons of beer and South Dakota rounded out the top three with 38.6 gallons of beer.

Fried beer won Most Creative Food at the 2010 Texas State Fair

State fairs have become synonymous with unique fried treats. At the 2010 Texas State Fair, deep-fried beer-filled pretzel pockets were entered into the Big Tex Choice Awards and won for Most Creative Food.

Mars has a crater named Beer

Beer is a crater located in the Margaritifer Sinus region of the planet Mars named after the German astronomer Wilhelm Beer. The next time you’re drinking beer under the stars, raise your glass and say, “Cheers to Beer.”

What’s the Difference Between Beer and Cider?

Beer is one of the most popular alcoholic beverages around the world, but cider, a staple in Britain, is growing in popularity in the states. Most cider and beer lovers have a hard time differentiating between the two. Here are a couple of differences you should be knowledgeable of.

Ingredients

Beer is made from malted barley while cider is made from fermented apple juice. There are several beers that contain fruit and other ingredients, but the core is always malted barley. No true cider contains malted grains.

Color

Beer comes in a variety of colors from pale to very dark depending on the malt. Ciders are often yellow, orange or brown. Ciders may also vary in cloudiness and sediment due to the fermentation process and filtering.

Sugar Content

The amount of sugar in beer compared to cider is the biggest difference. Beer contains a larger amount of complex sugars post-fermentation which aids in balancing bitterness and rounds out the mouthfeel. Beer and Cider both can have sugar added to it in order to dry it out or even to increase the sweetness. Sugar is not used post-fermentation to sweeten beer while with cider it can be used pre or post-filtering to balance the acidity or mouthfeel. Cider contains a higher quantity of sugar and varies per brand. Dry ciders allow the yeast to feed on the natural sugars to create a less sweet and higher alcohol content. As well as the difference in fermentation, beer is boiled while cider is more often than not, not boiled.

Health Benefits

The fruit juice in ciders contain antioxidants including polyphenols. According to one study, these antioxidants have been linked to protecting against certain types of cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Naturally occurring polyphenols are present in hops and malts, but brewers often remove it during the beer-making process because it makes the beer cloudy. In a study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health, beer does contain flavonoids (a type of polyphenol compound) that may be good for your heart.

Alcohol Content

Beer and cider have a similar alcohol content, but in America cider can be alcoholic as well as non-alcoholic. In most English speaking countries, cider is synonymous with alcoholic apple fermented products and apple juice encapsulates all of the other varieties of non-alcoholic apple beverages. Beer always contains alcohol.

These differences don’t make one better than the other. Some may say people who aren’t beer drinkers should start off with ciders and work their way to beer. Regardless of preference, there are a variety of ciders and beers to choose from. If you would like to taste the difference between a cider and beer, try McKenzie’s Hard Cider and Stella Artois Cidre.

Original: https://www.mclaughlinmoran.com/blog/?p=155

5 Amazing Health Benefits of Beer

We always hear about the amazing health benefits of wine, but what about beer? Here are five amazing health benefits of beer you may not have known.

Improves Cholesterol

A 2016 study by the American Heart Association revealed moderate consumption of beer slowly decreased cholesterol over time. You may think drinking more would increase those results, but the same study revealed that heavy drinking eliminated this benefit.

Improves Memory

Beer contains vitamin B12, which is essential in maintaining healthy brain cells, concentration, and memory.

Boost Problem-Solving Skills

A study published in the Consciousness and Cognition journal revealed that participants with a blood alcohol level of 0.07 or higher solved 40 percent more problems and took less time to complete than their sober counterparts.

The findings found that participants were in a more flexible mental state which allowed them to be more creative to solve problems compared to those who were sober.

Reduces the Risk of Kidney Stones

Beer acts as a diuretic and increases urination. An increase in urination helps remove toxins and other materials from the body that can result in kidney stones.

Aids in Digestion

Beer is a great source of fiber. It has more fiber than wine which makes it a better option.

Beer may have great health benefits, this does not mean you should increase your alcohol consumption. Remember to always drink beer and other alcoholic beverages in moderation. Do not drink and drive.

Original: https://www.mclaughlinmoran.com/blog/?p=165

How Does Beer Get Its Color?

The primary ingredients in beer include water, yeast, hops, and grains (malted barley or other grains). With our evolving taste in beer, this has led many breweries to introduce a variety of light, dark, seasonal and fruity beers. With such a variety of flavors and beer colors, what exactly is being added to beer to have so many variations?

Beer Colors

There are a variety of terms to describe the color of beer including pale, blonde, honey-like, straw, pale and much more, but how exactly does beer get its color?

The first method for measuring beer color was invented by J.W. Lovibond in 1873. The Lovibond system originally used colored slides to measure the degrees of color, but the beer color was later graded by comparing it to glass standards.

The Lovibond system’s limitations became apparent. By the 1950s, the American Society of Brewing Chemists utilized the Standard Reference Method (SRM) color system and the Europeans developed their color system called the European Brewing Convention (EBC). Both systems are derived from using light spectrophotometer technology. If you don’t have a spectrophotometer laying around, you can use calibrated color reference cards.

The most significant source of beer color comes from the pigments in the grain. The longer the grains are dried and the higher the drying temperature, the darker the grist and the more opaque the beer will be.

Caramelization also plays a role in the final color. When you heat sugar at a high temperature, the sugar molecules will fall apart. This darkens the malt.

What are Adjuncts?

Adjuncts, a non-malt source of fermentable sugars, can be added to the brewing process which will impact the color. Types of adjuncts may include barley, rye, oats, maize, honey, maple syrup, agave nectar, sugar, fruit, and other natural ingredients. Adjuncts can be added to lighten the body, prevent cloying sweetness, provide a silky mouthfeel and produce flavored beers like pumpkin ales.

Why the negativity on beer colors and adjuncts? It may stem from the idea of an all-malt beer offering a higher quality and full-bodied flavor and beers with adjuncts are viewed as low quality.

Beer has a rich history and even the SRM and EBC methods have limitations, but do a reasonable job. We hope this article helps you understand how beer gets its color and how it can change based on the brewing process.

Perfect Thanksgiving Beer Pairings

Thanksgiving is a wonderful holiday where family and friends come together, celebrate all things they’re thankful for and enjoy a delicious meal. When it comes to pairing your feast with beer, it may be daunting due to the vast range of flavor profiles on your average Thanksgiving plate.

To a novice beer drinker, any beer would possibly suffice. If you want to impress your guests and give them well-rounded flavors, we have a list of beer styles you’ll be thankful for.

Belgian Dubbel

Belgian dubbels are high in carbonation and moderately strong. These beers help break up the richness of gravy and potato dishes to act as a palate cleanser. Dubbels have a rich peppery and dark fruit flavor that complements poultry, stuffing, sweet potatoes, and cranberry sauce.

Brown Ale

Many Thanksgiving items are prepared in the oven and experience caramelization and browning just like the flavors of a brown ale. You’ll experience the malt flavors of roasted nuts, chocolate and caramel qualities that pair well with dishes prepared in the oven.

Scotch Ale

Scotch ales weigh heavier on the ABV scale (6-9%) which makes them ideal to hang with the richer dishes on your plate. The smooth, caramelized malt flavors with toffee and smoke can offer a savory and sweet flavor to your palate.

Strong Golden Ale

The base of a strong golden ale is Pilsner malt which works well with the mildness of white meat and the toasted flavor of stuffing. A strong golden ale has high carbonation which clears the palate for your next bite.

With these beer pairings, you’ll add a pinch of elegance to your plate without clashing with flavor.