The Perfect Day

I wake up at 6am and drink 2 cups of coffee.

I workout for 45 minutes then take a shower.

I prepare a light breakfast and eat while reading a book.

Do a DuoLingo lesson in Spanish for 30 minutes.

Listen to a podcast before I start my workday.

Video scripts get written and delivered to clients.

Play in Photoshop and Adobe Premiere Pro and create stuff I’m proud of.

Eat some more food while watching YouTube or Twitch.

Play video games with a glass of wine.

Read a book for an hour. 

Feeling amazing. That’s the perfect day.

Then go to bed.

This usually happens once or twice a week.

What usually happens…

Most days I wake up around 7am.

Turn on my computer and go to YouTube or Twitch and make a cup of coffee.

Each time I see an email notification, I brace myself for the generic job rejection email, but at least they didn’t ghost me.

I debate on whether or not I want to eat breakfast, skip it, or snack.

Open Google Drive to start writing video scripts, but I get distracted by who knows what.

No podcast. Just watching video game cutscenes to get me motivated to write. Yes, this works for me for some reason. 

Get the scripts done. Workout. Shower.

Scroll through Linkedin and Indeed looking for fulltime jobs during a pandemic when millions are now laid off.

Stress out that my unemployment is running low.

Try to figure out what I should have done and what I need to do with my life.

Debate if I want dinner. Odds are I skip it or snack.

Maybe watch a movie or play video games to calm my mind.

Hop into bed oddly feeling no regret about the day.

I still sleep well.

Every day doesn’t have to be perfect. You don’t have to accomplish X, Y, and Z. Try your hardest to do what you can, but don’t beat yourself up if things remain on your list. The perfect day varies and that’s alright.

 

 

The Constant Game of Regret

Woulda, coulda, shoulda.

Odds are, you regret more than one thing in your life. Whether it’s a previous relationship, educational choice, job, or that one moment when you should have said yes or no. We’ve all been there. As we live our lives, the constant game of regret is neverending.

Why do we regret so much?

If you’re lucky to live your life without regret, good for you. Many people aren’t that lucky.

Regret can eat at you longer than it should. You start to wonder, “I should have…” or “Why did I say…?” Your imagination starts to create different scenarios with outcomes you’ll never experience. These imagined outcomes fester in your brain and create alternate outcomes that stress you out more.

Constantly wondering “what if” drives us crazy.

Sometimes regret comes years later after you’ve had time to process things or during an evaluation of your life. This form of regret can cause temporary emotions, but since you’re so far removed from it, the imagined outcome doesn’t bother you as much unless the past decision is impacting your present life.

We can’t help but regret certain choices.

I’ve fallen victim to this mental deceit more than I’d like to admit.  I know how to find that one little thing that I could have done better and it annoys me.

Focus on the now.

“We all make mistakes, have struggles, and even regret things in our past. But you are not your mistakes, you are not your struggles, and you are here NOW with the power to shape your day and your future.”

― Steve Maraboli, Unapologetically You: Reflections on Life and the Human Experience

So what’s the message here? We can’t rewind time. Regret isn’t always delusional. Learn from what you feel was a mistake, but don’t let it mentally destroy you. Sometimes there is an element to learn. To improve.

What’s done is done. It will be hard. Nothing is easy. We experience new things each day. Regret is bound to reappear, but stay focused on the positive outcomes from your choices. There’s always some good that came out of a decision. Whether that positive is large or small, it’s always present.

Regret is part of life. It’s normal. It’s annoying. In the end, it can be enlightening.